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What Does It Mean If Your Blood Pressure Is High

What Does Diastolic Hypertension Mean

High Blood Pressure: How to Understand the Numbers

Having high diastolic blood pressure is a sign that your blood vessels have become less elastic, hardened, and scarred. Blood pressure is not a static reading as it tends to fluctuate throughout the day with the normal rate of diastolic blood pressure ranging between 60 to 80 mmHg.

Having flexible blood vessels allows your body to appropriately manage oscillations in blood pressure. However, when your blood vessels are rigid, the chances of vessel rupture or obstruction is more likely to occur.

What Is Normal Blood Pressure

A blood pressure reading is written like this: 120/80. It’s read as “120 over 80.” The top number is called the systolic, and bottom number is called the diastolic. The ranges are:

  • Normal: Less than 120 over 80
  • Elevated: 120-129/less than 80
  • Stage 1 high blood pressure: 130-139/80-89
  • Stage 2 high blood pressure: 140 and above/90 and above
  • Hypertension crisis: higher than 180/higher than 120 — See a doctor right away

If your blood pressure is above the normal range, talk to your doctor about how to lower it.

Blood Pressure And Heart Rate Are Always Linked

False: It is true that blood pressure and heart rate often rise and fall together, Dr. Laffin says. When you face danger, for example, your blood pressure and pulse may both jump upward at the same time. However, if your heart rate rises, that doesnt automatically mean your blood pressure will rise or vice versa.

When the two are disconnected, you may be looking at a specific problem, Dr. Laffin says. For example, if you are dehydrated, bleeding or have a severe infection, blood pressure typically decreases and heart rate increases.

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What Was The Prevalence Of Hypertension Among Adults During 20152016

Overall, the prevalence of hypertension among adults was 29.0%, and was similar among men and women .

The prevalence of hypertension increased with age, from 7.5% among adults aged 1839 to 33.2% among those aged 4059, and 63.1% among those aged 60 and over. A similar pattern was found among both men and women.

Men had a higher prevalence of hypertension than women among adults aged 1839 and 4059 , but men had a lower prevalence of hypertension than women among adults 60 and over .

Figure 1. Prevalence of hypertension among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and age: United States, 20152016

1Men significantly different from women in the same age group.2Significant increasing trend by age.NOTES: Estimates for age group 18 and over are age adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 U.S. Census population using age groups 1839, 4059, and 60 and over. Crude estimates for age group 18 and over are 32.1%, total 31.8%, men and 32.4%, women. Access data table for Figure 1pdf icon.SOURCE: NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 20152016.

Common Causes Of High Blood Pressure Spikes

High blood pressure: Like an over

Some people with high blood pressure will experience sharp rises in their blood pressure. These spikes, which typically last only a short period of time, are also known as sudden high blood pressure. These are some possible causes:

  • Caffeine
  • Certain medications or combinations of medications
  • Chronic kidney disease

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The ‘bottom’ Blood Pressure Number Matters Too

HealthDay Reporter

THURSDAY, July 18, 2019 — When it comes to blood pressure readings, the “top” number seems to grab all the attention.

But a large, new study confirms that both numbers are, in fact, critical in determining the risk of heart attack and stroke.

Blood pressure measurements are given as a “top” and “bottom” number. The first reflects systolic blood pressure, the amount of pressure in the arteries as the heart contracts. The second reflects diastolic blood pressure, the pressure in the arteries between heart muscle contractions.

For years, systolic blood pressure has been seen as the one that really matters. That’s based on studies — including the famous Framingham Heart Study — showing that high systolic blood pressure is a stronger predictor of heart disease and stroke.

At the same time, though, doctors measure both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and treatment guidelines are based on both. So just how important is that diastolic number?

“The idea behind this new study was to address the confusion,” said lead researcher Dr. Alexander Flint, an investigator with Kaiser Permanente Northern California’s division of research.

Using medical records from 1.3 million patients, his team confirmed that, yes, high systolic blood pressure was a stronger risk factor for heart attack and stroke. But those risks also climbed in tandem with diastolic pressure and people with normal systolic readings were still at risk if their diastolic pressure was high.

Why Is My Bottom Number On Blood Pressure High

The bottom number refers to your blood pressure when your heart muscle is between beats. This is called diastolic pressure. Both numbers are important in determining the state of your heart health. Numbers greater than the ideal range indicate that your heart is working too hard to pump blood to the rest of your body.

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How Blood Pressure Is Controlled

When the heart contracts, the blood inside the left ventricle is forced out into the aorta and arteries. The blood then enters small vessels with muscular walls, called arterioles. The tone in the muscular walls of the arterioles determines how relaxed or constricted they are. If narrowed, they resist flow.Reduced flow of blood is detected in the brain, the kidneys and elsewhere. Nerve reflexes are stimulated and hormones are then produced. The heart is induced to beat more forcefully so that blood pressure is maintained at a higher level, to overcome the restricted flow through the arterioles. The achievement of good flow eases possible problems for function of the brain and kidneys.These adjustments occur normally. However, in some people the adjustments become fixed and high blood pressure persists. These people have developed hypertension.

High Blood Pressure Treatment

Blood pressure: what is blood pressure?

The best way to lower blood pressure begins with changes you can make to your lifestyle to help lower your blood pressure and reduce your risk of heart disease. Additionally, your doctor may prescribe medicine to lower your blood pressure. These are called antihypertensive medicines.

The goal of treatment is to reduce your blood pressure to normal levels. Your doctor may prescribe medicine thats easy to take and has few, if any, side effects. This treatment is highly successful. If your blood pressure can only be controlled with medicine, youll need to take the medicine for the rest of your life. It is common to need more than one medicine to help control your blood pressure. Dont stop taking the medicine without talking with your doctor. Otherwise, you may increase your risk of having a stroke or heart attack.

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What Are The Treatments For High Blood Pressure

Treatments for high blood pressure include heart-healthy lifestyle changes and medicines.

You will work with your provider to come up with a treatment plan. It may include only the lifestyle changes. These changes, such as heart-healthy eating and exercise, can be very effective. But sometimes the changes do not control or lower your high blood pressure. Then you may need to take medicine. There are different types of blood pressure medicines. Some people need to take more than one type.

If your high blood pressure is caused by another medical condition or medicine, treating that condition or stopping the medicine may lower your blood pressure.

NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Were Differences Seen In The Prevalence Of Hypertension Among Adults By Race And Hispanic Origin During 20152016

For all adults, the prevalence of hypertension among non-Hispanic black adults was higher than among non-Hispanic white , non-Hispanic Asian , and Hispanic adults .

In men, the prevalence of hypertension was higher among non-Hispanic black adults than among non-Hispanic white , non-Hispanic Asian , and Hispanic adults.

In women, the prevalence of hypertension was higher among non-Hispanic black adults than among non-Hispanic white , non-Hispanic Asian , and Hispanic adults. Hispanic women had a significantly higher prevalence of hypertension than non-Hispanic Asian women.

No significant differences were observed between men and women within race and Hispanic-origin groups.

Figure 2. Age-adjusted prevalence of hypertension among adults aged 18 and over, by sex and race and Hispanic origin: United States, 20152016

1Significant difference from non-Hispanic Asian.2Significant difference from non-Hispanic white.3Significant difference from Hispanic.NOTES: All estimates are age adjusted by the direct method to the 2000 U.S. Census population using age groups 1839, 4059, and 60 and over. Access data table for Figure 2pdf icon.SOURCE: NCHS, National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 20152016.

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When To See A Doctor

The symptoms of high blood pressure are typically silent. Many people may not find out they have high blood pressure until they visit their doctor for a routine physical. If you dont already have a primary care doctor, the Healthline FindCare tool can help you find a physician in your area.

There are many home blood pressure monitors available so that you can monitor your blood pressure at home. Some people that should consider doing this include:

  • those with a family history of high blood pressure
  • people who are overweight or obese
  • smokers
  • women who are pregnant

You should always keep a log of your readings. Its important to note that home blood pressure monitoring isnt a substitute for a doctors visit. If you find that your readings are consistently high, you should make an appointment with your doctor to discuss them.

What Is The Difference

Get to Know Your Blood Pressure

The major difference between the old and new guidelines is the elimination of the category of pre-hypertension. However, findings from research studies show that complications can exist when blood pressure is as low as 130-139 over 80-89.

The new guidelines change the categories. Those same readings that would have been pre-hypertension are now categorized as stage I hypertension. Doing so means earlier treatment, which can help prevent future increases in blood pressure and more serious complications associated with hypertension.

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Garlic And Garlic Milk

Considered one of the most effective natural remedies for diastolic hypertension. It is good for thrombosis, hardening of the arteries, and high blood cholesterol. Using fresh garlic is best. You can also make garlic milk by heating half a liter of water and milk and boil 10 garlic cloves in it. When it cools off, you can add some honey to it before drinking.

What Do The Blood Pressure Numbers Mean

When blood pressure is measured, the result is given as two numbers, such as 120/80. The first number is the amount of force used when the heart beats . The second number is the pressure in the arteries between heart beats . Pressures are measured in millimeters of mercury . High blood pressure is defined as pressures above 140/90 for a period of time. Prehypertension is defined as a systolic pressure from 120139 millimeters of mercury or a diastolic pressure from 8089 mm Hg. Because blood pressure changes often, your health care provider will check it on several different days before deciding whether your blood pressure is too high. Blood pressure is considered high when it is elevated above 140/90 for a period of time. For people with chronic kidney disease, the recommended level is below 130/80.

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What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Pressure

Most people who have high blood pressure do not have symptoms. This is why its sometimes called the silent killer. It is very important to have your blood pressure checked regularly.

Some people experience headaches, nosebleeds, or shortness of breath with high blood pressure. However, those symptoms can mimic many other things . Usually, these symptoms occur once blood pressure has reached a dangerously high level over a period of time.

How Is It Diagnosed

High Blood Pressure and Your Heart

Because it is such a common problem, blood pressure is checked at most healthcare visits. High blood pressure is usually discovered during one of these visits. If your blood pressure is high, you will be asked to return for follow-up checks. If repeated checks of your blood pressure show that it is higher than 140/90, you have hypertension.

Your healthcare provider will ask about your life situation, what you eat and drink, and if high blood pressure runs in your family. You may have urine and blood tests. Your provider may order a chest X-ray and an electrocardiogram . You may be asked to use a portable blood-pressure measuring device, which will take your pressure at different times during day and night. All of this testing is done to look for a possible cause of your high blood pressure.

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Endocrine And Kidney Causes

The endocrine system is composed of a collection of glands that secrete hormones directly into the circulatory system. These hormones are able to target distant organs, helping to regulate physiology and behavior. The thyroid gland is one of these endocrine structures and it can produce abnormal levels of hormones that lead to elevations of diastolic blood pressure. Problems with the kidney, such as renal failure, are also a common reason for blood pressure increases.

Secondary High Blood Pressure

Some cases of high blood pressure are the result of underlying factors or cause and this is known as secondary high blood pressure.

Underlying factors include:

  • kidney conditions, such as a kidney infection, or kidney disease
  • narrowing of the arteries
  • hormonal conditions, such as Cushing’s syndrome
  • conditions that affect the bodys tissue, such as lupus
  • medication, such as the oral contraceptive pill, or the type of painkillers that are known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs , such as ibuprofen
  • recreational drugs, such as cocaine, amphetamines and crystal meth

Occasionally, a rise in blood pressure can result from taking herbal remedies, such as herbal supplements.

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How Is High Blood Pressure Diagnosed

To figure out your blood pressure rate, your health care provider takes blood pressure readings at different times. You need more than 1 reading because blood pressure changes depending on what you are doing and varies during the day. For example, your blood pressure can increase when you are nervous or in a hurry.

If your blood pressure is high while with your health care provider but normal otherwise, you may just be nervous. This effect is common. Even people already being treated for high blood pressure go through this.

What matters is what happens to your blood pressure outside your health care providers office. If you have high blood pressure, you should use a home blood pressure monitor. Ask your health care provider how to use the monitor correctly.

British Columbia Specific Information

Magnesium: A Natural Treatment for High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, also called hypertension, can damage your blood vessels, heart and kidneys. This damage can cause a heart attack, stroke or other health problems. Your blood pressure reading is based on two measurements called systolic and diastolic. The systolic and diastolic are written as a ratio, for example . A reading of more than 140/90 mmHg taken at your healthcare providers office may indicate high blood pressure. This figure is different for people with diabetes whose blood pressure should be below 130/80 mmHg. People suffering from other illnesses will have different target normal values. For more information on hypertension, visit the Heart & Stroke Foundation and Hypertension Canada.

Healthy lifestyle choices can help lower your blood pressure and improve your health. For information on healthy eating for lowering your blood pressure, see:

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What Are The Dangers Of High Blood Pressure

High blood pressure, or hypertension, is known as the silent killer. This means it does not have any symptoms and can go untreated for a long time, which can lead to many major health risks. If left untreated, a blood pressure of 180/120 or higher results in an 80% chance of death within one year, with an average survival rate of ten months. Prolonged, untreated high blood pressure can also lead to heart attack, stroke, blindness, and kidney disease.

Treating High Blood Pressure

Treatment for high blood pressure will depend on your blood pressure levels and your associated risk of developing a cardiovascular disease, such as a heart attack or stroke.

There are seven main risk factors for developing a cardiovascular disease. These are:

  • age
  • smoking
  • obesity
  • having a high level of cholesterol in your blood
  • having a family history of cardiovascular disease .

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What Are The Effects Of High Blood Pressure

It all starts in the arteries and the heart. Having high blood pressure increases the workload of your entire cardiovascular system. The heart and arteries are not as efficient at circulating blood, meaning they constantly have to work harder to fulfill the same function.

Plus, as blood flows through your arteries with a higher than normal amount of force, this causes damage overtime. This damage can lead to tiny tears in your arteries, as well as plaque build up, both of which can make your blood pressure even higher.

In addition to the serious toll it takes on your heart and arteries, high blood pressure can also contribute to vision loss, kidney disease or failure and stroke.

Diastolic Hypertension Vs Systolic Hypertension

High Blood Pressure: Definition and Treatment

For decades, it was assumed that diastolic hypertension, an increase in the bottom number of blood pressure readings, was a more concerning finding than systolic hypertension. However, this thinking has now changed, as systolic blood pressure has been found to play a more significant role in the development of various blood pressure complications such as stroke and left ventricular hypertrophy.

A recent study assessing cardiovascular risk in treated hypertensive men found that the control of systolic blood pressure was more important for overall survival, with diastolic blood pressure having little value for predicting future cardiovascular risk.

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