Wednesday, June 15, 2022
HomeEditor PicksIs High Blood Pressure Heart Disease

Is High Blood Pressure Heart Disease

Blood Pressure And Ageing

High Blood Pressure In Young Adults Could Lead To Heart Disease

With advancing years, the arteries tend to become more rigid . This may change a persons blood pressure pattern, with a higher systolic pressure and a lower diastolic pressure. The higher systolic pressure is important because it can further accelerate the rigidity of the arteries. This state is referred to as isolated systolic hypertension. Although these changes are due to ageing, this is not a normal state and may need medication to control the systolic pressures.

Sleep Apneas Effects On The Cardiovascular System

The repetitive pauses in breathing that characterize sleep apnea can stress and potentially damage not only the heart, but the whole cardiovascular system. While researchers are continuing to learn about the ways in which sleep apnea affects the cardiovascular system and contributes to heart disease, several biological pathways have been suggested.

What Are Clinical Trials For High Blood Pressure And Kidney Disease

Clinical trialsand other types of clinical studiesare part of medical research and involve people like you. When you volunteer to take part in a clinical study, you help doctors and researchers learn more about disease and improve health care for people in the future.

Researchers are studying many aspects of high blood pressure and kidney disease, such as

  • managing high blood pressure through diet, education, and counseling in patients with kidney disease
  • testing new medications to treat high blood pressure and kidney disease

Find out if clinical studies are right for you.

Also Check: What Is Blood Pressure Supposed To Be

Will High Blood Pressure Effect My Chances Of Getting Pregnant

Women who improve their heart health before pregnancy can reduce their medical risks later. This proactive approach can lower the likelihood of pregnancy complications. If youre considering becoming pregnant, talk to your health care team about healthy changes you can make to help both you and your baby be healthier.

Doctors and researchers have found a link between birth control pills and an increase in blood pressure among some women. They say that it is more likely to occur in women who are overweight, have kidney disease or have a family history of high blood pressure.

Learn more about pregnancy and maternal health, including information on being healthy before, during and after a pregnancy.

Written by American Heart Association editorial staff and reviewed by science and medicine advisers. See our editorial policies and staff.

What Diet Helps Control High Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure or Heart Disease
  • Eat foods that are lower in fat, salt and calories, such as skim or 1% milk, fresh vegetables and fruits, and whole grain rice, and pasta.
  • Use flavorings, spices and herbs to make foods tasty without using salt. The optimal recommendation for salt in your diet is to have less than 1500 milligrams of sodium a day. Don’t forget that most restaurant foods and many processed and frozen foods contain high levels of salt. Use herbs and spices that do not contain salt in recipes to flavor your food; do not add salt at the table.
  • Avoid or cut down on butter and margarine, regular salad dressings, fatty meats, whole milk dairy products, fried foods, processed foods or fast foods, and salted snacks.
  • Ask your provider if you should increase potassium in your diet Discuss the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet with your provider. The DASH diet emphasizes adding fruits, vegetables, and whole grains to your diet while reducing the amount of sodium. Since it is rich in fruits and vegetables, which are naturally lower in sodium than many other foods, the DASH diet makes it easier to eat less salt and sodium.

Read Also: What Does Hypertension Feel Like

Sleep Apnea And Heart Disease

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and globally. Several behaviors increase the risk of heart disease, including eating an unhealthy diet, not getting enough physical activity, drinking too much alcohol, and smoking. Health conditions that increase the risk of heart disease include high blood pressure, unhealthy cholesterol levels, diabetes, and obesity.

Untreated sleep apnea also significantly increases the risk of heart arrhythmias and cardiovascular disease. Its estimated that patients with sleep apnea are 2-4 four times more likely to develop heart arrhythmias than people without this condition. Sleep apnea increases the risk of heart failure by 140% and the risk of coronary heart disease by 30%.

How Do I Know If I Have High Blood Pressure

Theres only one way to know if you have high blood pressure: Have a doctor or other health professional measure it. Measuring your blood pressure;is quick and painless.

Talk with your health care team about regularly measuring your blood pressure at home, also called self-measured blood pressure monitoring.

High blood pressure is called the silent killer because it usually has no warning signs or symptoms, and many people do not know they have it.

You May Like: How To Get Rid Of Low Blood Pressure

How To Lower Blood Pressure

There are lots of things you can do to lower your blood pressure.

If your doctor has given you blood pressure medication, take it as prescribed. However, you’ll also need to follow a heart-healthy lifestyle.

Even if you haven’t been diagnosed with hypertension, following these tips will be good for your blood pressure and good for your heart.

Quit smoking

Stopping smoking is a great thing you can do for your blood pressure and your heart health.

Ask your doctor or nurse for help.

Phone Quitline 0800 778 778, or visit quit.org.nz for information and support.

Eat more heart-healthy foods and less salt

What you put into your body can make a big difference to your blood pressure.

Eat a wide variety of heart-healthy foods like:

  • whole grains

Read more about the benefits of exercise.

Manage stress

Researchers are still trying to understand the exact link between stress and long-term high blood pressure. However being stressed contributes to other risk factors like poor diet and drinking more alcohol.

You can’t always remove the sources of stress in your life. But here are some things you can do to manage them.

  • Enjoy exercise every day, like taking a walk.
  • Take a break for yourself.
  • Get 7-8 hours plus sleep each night.
  • Talk about how you are feeling.
  • Try relaxation music or breathing exercises.

What Are The Symptoms Of High Blood Pressure And Kidney Disease

British Heart Foundation – High blood pressure and heart disease

Most people with high blood pressure do not have symptoms. In rare cases, high blood pressure can cause headaches.

Early CKD also may not have symptoms. As kidney disease gets worse, some people may have swelling, called edema. Edema happens when the kidneys cannot get rid of extra fluid and salt. Edema can occur in the legs, feet, ankles, orless oftenin the hands or face.

Symptoms of advanced kidney disease can include

  • loss of appetite, nausea, or vomiting
  • drowsiness, feeling tired, or sleep problems
  • headaches or trouble concentrating
  • chest pain or shortness of breath

Read Also: What Is A Dangerously High Blood Pressure

How To Prepare For A Blood Pressure Test

Your doctor will use a blood pressure test to see if you have higher-than-normal blood pressure readings. The reading is made up of two numbers, with the systolic number above the diastolic number. These numbers are measures of pressure in mm Hg. To learn more about systolic and diastolic pressure, visit How the Heart Works.

A blood pressure test is easy and painless and can be done in a doctor’s office or clinic. A healthcare provider will use a gauge, stethoscope, or electronic sensor and a blood pressure cuff to measure your blood pressure. To prepare, take the following steps:

  • Do not exercise, drink coffee, or smoke cigarettes for 30 minutes before the test.
  • Go to the bathroom before the test.
  • For at least 5 minutes before the test, sit in a chair and relax.
  • Make sure your feet are flat on the floor.
  • Do not talk while you are relaxing or during the test.
  • Uncover your arm for the cuff.
  • Rest your arm on a table so it is supported and at the level of your heart.

If it is the first time your provider has measured your blood pressure, you may have readings taken on both arms.

You can also take your blood pressure at home or at a pharmacy. Visit Measure Your Blood Pressure for more information.

Why Is Hypertension An Important Issue In Low

The prevalence of hypertension varies across regions and country income groups. The WHO African Region has the highest prevalence of hypertension while the WHO Region of the Americas has the lowest prevalence of hypertension .

The number of adults with hypertension increased from 594 million in 1975 to 1.13 billion in 2015, with the increase seen largely in low- and middle-income countries. This increase is due mainly to a rise in hypertension risk factors in those populations.

Read Also: When To Treat High Blood Pressure

Activating The Sympathetic Nervous System

Each time a person with sleep apnea stops breathing, the level of oxygen in the blood decreases. As the body becomes deprived of oxygen, specialized cells called chemoreceptors detect these changes and activate the sympathetic nervous system to respond, which is the part of the nervous system responsible for reacting to stressful or dangerous situations. The sympathetic nervous system triggers the body to gasp for air, which sometimes wakes a person out of sleep.

The sympathetic nervous system also responds to a low level of oxygen by constricting blood vessels and increasing heart rate and blood pressure. As the pauses in breath continue throughout the night, repetitive changes in blood pressure may lead to hypertension or make existing hypertension worse.

Risks Of High Blood Pressure

High Blood Pressure and Hypertensive Heart Disease â Wayne ...

If your blood pressure is too high, it puts extra strain on your blood vessels, heart and other organs, such as the brain, kidneys and eyes.

Persistent high blood pressure can increase your risk of a number of serious and potentially life-threatening health conditions, such as:

  • have a relative with high blood pressure
  • are of black African or black Caribbean descent
  • live in a deprived area

Making healthy lifestyle changes can sometimes help reduce your chances of getting high blood pressure and help lower your blood pressure;if it’s already high.

Recommended Reading: What Causes Your Blood Pressure To Be High

Why Is It Important To Know If You Have High Blood Pressure

Early detection of high blood pressure is very important. Often referred to as the silent killer because it may show no symptoms, high blood pressure puts you at an increased risk for heart disease, heart failure, and stroke, among other things. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2013, more than 360,000 deaths in the United States included high blood pressure as a primary or contributing cause.

How Is Hypertensive Heart Disease Diagnosed

Your doctor will look for certain signs of hypertensive heart disease, including:

  • High blood pressure
  • Fluid in the lungs or lower extremities
  • Unusual heart sounds

Your doctor may perform tests to determine if you have hypertensive heart disease, including an electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, cardiac stress test, chest X-ray, and coronary angiogram.

Recommended Reading: What Is Hypertensive Blood Pressure

Heart Attack And Heart Disease

High blood pressure can damage your arteries by making them less elastic, which decreases the flow of blood and oxygen to your heart and leads to heart disease. In addition, decreased blood flow to the heart can cause:

  • Chest pain, also called angina.
  • Heart attack, which happens when the blood supply to your heart is blocked and heart muscle begins to die without enough oxygen. The longer the blood flow is blocked, the greater the damage to the heart.
  • Heart failure, a condition that means your heart cant pump enough blood and oxygen to your other organs.

Manage Your Diabetes Abcs

Study links early high cholesterol and blood pressure to increased heart disease risk

Know your diabetes ABCs to help you manage your blood glucose, blood pressure, and cholesterol. Stop smoking if you have diabetes to lower your chances of developing heart disease.

A is for the A1C test. The A1C test;shows your average blood glucose level over the past 3 months. This is different from the blood glucose checks you do every day. The higher your A1C number, the higher your blood glucose levels have been during the past 3 months. High levels of blood glucose can harm your heart, blood vessels, kidneys, feet, and eyes.

The A1C goal for many people with diabetes is below 7%. Some people may do better with a slightly higher A1C goal. Your A1C goals may also change as you get older and your lifestyle changes. Ask your health care team what your goal should be.

B is for blood pressure. Blood pressure is the force of your blood against the wall of your blood vessels. If your blood pressure gets too high, it makes your heart work too hard. High blood pressure can cause a heart attack or stroke and damage your kidneys and eyes.

The blood pressure goal for most people with diabetes is below 140/90 mm Hg. Ask what your goal should be.

S is for stop smoking. Quitting smoking is especially important for people with diabetes because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels, so your heart has to work harder. E-cigarettes arent a safe option either.

If you quit smoking

Read Also: What Gives You High Blood Pressure

Spotting The Warning Signs Of Critically Low Blood Pressure

For many individuals, hypotension is no reason to worry desirable, even. But for others, abnormally low blood pressure can manifest in a variety of health issues. The majority of medical professionals;will only consider chronically low blood pressure as dangerous if it causes noticeable signs and symptoms. For this reason, it is crucial that individuals familiarize themselves with the warning signs of low blood pressure all ranging in their severity so that it may be treated properly and in a timely manner. Such symptoms may include dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, blurred or fading vision, fatigue, nausea, lack of concentration, etc. In patients with more dire cases,;low blood pressure can be life-threatening.;Patients bodies may go into shock as a result of extreme hypotension, causing a weak or rapid pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; cold, clammy, pale skin; and confusion, especially in older individuals. People who encounter signs of shock are advised to immediately;seek emergency medical help.;Although most instances of low blood pressure merely necessitate routine examination to monitor readings,;its important to see your doctor if you have signs or symptoms of low blood pressure because they can point to more serious problems.

Confirming High Blood Pressure

To diagnose high blood pressure, your doctor will take two or more readings at separate medical appointments. Learn more about screening for high blood pressure, including how to take it yourself.

For most adults, a normal blood pressure is less than 120/80 mm Hg. Your doctor may diagnose you with high blood pressure when you have consistent systolic readings of 130 mm Hg or higher or diastolic readings of 80 mm Hg or higher.

Upmc Central Pa Portal

UPMC Central Pa. Portal;provides patients across the central Pennsylvania region with secure access to their health information. It is the fastest way to send a message to your doctor, refill prescriptions, get test results, and schedule and manage appointments, including video visits.

How Is Hypertensive Heart Disease Treated

High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

In order to treat hypertensive heart disease, your doctor has to treat the high blood pressure that is causing it. They will treat it with a variety of drugs, including diuretics, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, and vasodilators.

In addition, your doctor may advise you to make changes to your lifestyle, including:

  • Diet: If heart failure is present, you should lower your daily intake of sodium to 1,500 mg or 2 g or less per day, eat foods high in fiber and potassium, limit total daily calories to lose weight if necessary, and limit intake of foods that contain refined sugar, trans fats, and cholesterol.
  • Monitoring your weight: This involves daily recording of weight, increasing your activity level , resting between activities more often, and planning your activities.
  • Avoiding tobacco products and alcohol
  • Regular medical checkups: During follow-up visits, your doctor will make sure you are staying healthy and that your heart disease is not getting worse.

Central Nervous System And Ophthalmologic System

Central nervous system examination findings are usually unremarkable unless the patient has had previous cerebrovascular accidents with residual deficit. CNS changes may also be seen in patients who present with hypertensive emergency.

Examination of the fundi may reveal evidence of hypertensive retinopathy, the severity of which depends on the duration and severity of the patient’s hypertension, or earlier signs of hypertension, such as arteriovenous nicking.

The Damage Can Build Over Time

The excess strain and resulting damage from high blood pressure; causes the coronary arteries serving the heart to slowly become narrowed from a buildup of fat, cholesterol and other substances that together are called plaque. This slow process is known as atherosclerosis.

As arteries harden with plaque, blood clots become more likely to form. When an artery becomes blocked due to an accumulation of plaque or a blood clot, the flow of blood through the heart muscle is interrupted, starving the muscle of oxygen and nutrients. The damage or death of part of the heart muscle that occurs as a result is called a heart attack;.

Watch what happens during a heart attack.

Cholesterol Management Clinical Practice Guidelines

The recommendations on management of blood cholesterol were released in November 2018 by the American College of Cardiology , American Heart Association , and multiple other medical societies.

The guideline’s top 10 key recommendations for reducing the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease through cholesterol management are summarized below.

Emphasize a heart-healthy lifestyle across the life course of all individuals.

In patients with clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease , reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels with high-intensity statin therapy or the maximally tolerated statin therapy.

In individuals with very high-risk ASCVD, use an LDL-C threshold of 70 mg/dL to consider the addition of nonstatins to statin therapy.

In patients with severe primary hypercholesterolemia , without calculating the 10-year ASCVD risk, begin high-intensity statin therapy.

In patients 40 to 75 years of age with diabetes mellitus and an LDL-C level of 70 mg/dL: Start moderate-intensity statin therapy without calculating their 10-year ASCVD risk.

In patients aged 40 to 75 years evaluated for primary ASCVD prevention: Have a clinicianpatient risk discussion before starting statin therapy.

In nondiabetic patients aged 40 to 75 years and with the following characteristics:

References
  • Kannel WB, Cobb J. Left ventricular hypertrophy and mortality–results from the Framingham Study. Cardiology. 1992. 81:291-8. .

  • Tables

    RELATED ARTICLES

    Popular Articles