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What Sinus Medicine Can I Take With High Blood Pressure

Keeping Kidneys Safe: Smart Choices About Medicines

I have high blood pressure. Why should I avoid decongestants? What can I take instead?

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If you have chronic kidney disease , diabetes, or high blood pressureor if you take certain blood pressure medicines that affect your kidneysyou should take steps to protect your kidneys from harm.

ACE inhibitors and ARBs are two types of blood pressure medicine that may slow the loss of kidney function and delay kidney failure. You can tell if youre taking one of these medicines by its generic name. ACE inhibitors end in pril and ARBs have generic names that end in sartan for example, lisinopril and losartan.

You may also take a diuretic, sometimes called a water pill, to meet your blood pressure goals.

The information below explains

  • actions you can take to keep your kidneys safe while taking these blood pressure medicines
  • why you sometimes need to take special care with medicines for example, when youre sick, dehydrated, or thinking about whether or not to take an over-the-counter medicine

Stuffy And Runny Nose

Nonallergic rhinitis occurs when blood vessels in your nose expand , filling the nasal lining with blood and fluid. There are several possible causes of this abnormal expansion of the blood vessels or inflammation in the nose. But, whatever the trigger, the result is the same swollen nasal membranes and congestion.

Many things can trigger the nasal swelling in nonallergic rhinitis some resulting in short-lived symptoms while others cause chronic problems. Nonallergic rhinitis triggers include:

Environmental or occupational irritants. Dust, smog, secondhand smoke or strong odors, such as perfumes, can trigger nonallergic rhinitis. Chemical fumes, such as those you might be exposed to in certain occupations, also may be to blame.

Weather changes. Temperature or humidity changes can trigger the membranes inside your nose to swell and cause a runny or stuffy nose.

Infections. A common cause of nonallergic rhinitis is a viral infection a cold or the flu, for example. This type of nonallergic rhinitis usually clears up after a few weeks, but can cause lingering mucus in the throat . Sometimes, this type of rhinitis can become chronic, causing ongoing discolored nasal discharge, facial pain and pressure .

Foods and beverages. Nonallergic rhinitis may occur when you eat, especially when eating hot or spicy foods. Drinking alcoholic beverages also may cause the membranes inside your nose to swell, leading to nasal congestion.

How To Treat Sinus Headache If You Have Both High Blood Pressure And Are Taking Thyroid Medicine

Asked
17 Jan 2015 by Dan2525

SHEsevEN4

Mucinex Cold & Sinus, can cause or raise blood pressure, I take thyroid medicine you could take it with that, I would consult with your Doctor before taking it, there are some over the counter med’s that you can take with high blood pressure, clorcentin is one, I know I didn’t spell that right, you could also call the drugstore and ask them I’m sure they would know what would be best for you to take.

+0yellowlabs

Ask your doc or pharmacist about taking Claritin – it’s okay for HBP, but I’m not sure about the thyroid.

+0

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What Allergy Medicines Can I Take If I Have High Blood Pressure

Although some allergy medicines affect your blood pressure or interact with your blood pressure medication, safe options for treating your allergy symptoms exist if you have high blood pressure.

Second-generation antihistamines that are not combined with decongestants are generally safe to use if you are not taking the blood pressure medicines listed in the drug interaction section above. Second-generation antihistamines include the following:

  • Allegra
  • Xyzal
  • Zyrtec

If your symptoms include nasal congestion, the following options are generally safe to use as decongestants:

  • steroid nasal sprays, such as Flonase , Nasacort , and Rhinocort
  • antihistamine nasal sprays, such as Astelin and Patanase
  • saline nasal sprays or rinses, such as Ayr, Ocean, Simply Saline, or Neti Pot

Antihistamine eye drops, such as Pataday and Zaditor , are safe options for itchy watery eyes.

Medications To Avoid If You Have High Blood Pressure

Coricidin HBP Cold &  Flu for People with High Blood ...

Blood pressure is best understood as the force of blood pressing against the walls of your arteries. A person can be diagnosed with high blood pressure, also called hypertension, when their blood pressure is consistently greater than 140/90 mm Hg.

When a persons blood pressure is too high, their hearts need to work harder which can cause serious damage to the arteries. Over time, uncontrolled high blood pressure increases the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney disease.

Some medications can increase your blood pressure, so its important to be aware of which medications to avoid if your blood pressure is already elevated. If you are unsure of whether a medication might impact your current blood pressure state, your physician or pharmacist are the first resources you should consult. Often, they will be able to recommend an alternative product that will not affect your blood pressure.

Oral Nasal Decongestants

Oral nasal decongestants like Sudafed and Sudafed PE can increase blood pressure by elevating your heart rate and causing blood vessels to narrow, also known as vasoconstriction. Pseudoephedrine and phenylephedrine can also be found in many cold, cough and flu combination products. If you suffer from cold, cough or flu symptoms, try Coricidin HBP products.

Topical Nasal Decongestants

Topical Hemorrhoid Products

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Urgent Advice: Call 111 For Advice Now If:

  • you take too much pseudoephedrine

Taking too much pseudoephedrine can be dangerous.

It can make you restless or your heartbeat fast, and make you feel sick or vomit. You may also have difficulty peeing.

Go to 111.nhs.uk or call 111.

If you need to go to A& E, do not drive yourself. Get someone else to drive you or call for an ambulance.

Take the pseudoephedrine packet or leaflet inside it, plus any remaining medicine, with you.

Managing A Cold With Hypertension

If you cant take a decongestant because of high blood pressure, there are other ways to reduce your cold or allergy symptoms:

  • Take Coricidin HBP, which is free of decongestants

  • Drink plenty of fluids including water, juice, tea and soup to prevent dehydration and clear mucus from your lungs

  • Take a pain reliever such as Tylenol or Motrin for fever, sore throat, body aches and headache

  • Flush your sinuses with a saline spray to relieve nasal congestion

  • Soothe a sore or scratchy throat with lozenges

  • Use a vaporizer or humidifier if necessary to boost humidity

  • Get plenty of rest

  • Return to your doctor after five to seven days to make sure youre on the road to recovery

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Blood Pressure And Cough And Cold Medications

Many cough and cold medications contain NSAIDs to relieve pain. NSAIDs may increase your blood pressure. Cough and cold medicines also frequently contain . can make blood pressure worse in two ways:

  • Decongestants may make your blood pressure and heart rate rise.
  • Decongestants may prevent high blood pressure drugs from working properly.

What can you do? Avoid using cough and cold medicine that contains NSAIDs or decongestants. Ask your doctor for suggestions about other ways to ease symptoms of cold, flu, or sinus problems.

Nonprescription Products To Avoid With Hypertension

Alternatives To High Blood Pressure Medication – Pritikin

W. Steven Pray, PhD, DPhBernhardt Professor, Nonprescription Products and DevicesCollege of Pharmacy, Southwestern Oklahoma State UniversityWeatherford, Oklahoma

US Pharm.

Researchers have charted an alarming rise in the number of persons with hypertension. For example, the number rose by 30% from 1994 to 2000.1 The CDC estimated the percentage of noninstitutionalized adults aged 20 years and above with hypertension to be 32%.2 The number of ambulatory visits that have hypertension as the primary diagnosis is estimated to be 40.5 million.2 In 2006, there were 23,855 deaths due to hypertension, or 8 per 100,000 population.2

The National Institutes of Health has provided this hypertension advice for the lay public: Most of the time, high blood pressure can be controlled with medicine and lifestyle changes.3 Of course, this optimistic statement assumes that patients do not unknowingly take any action that would raise their blood pressure. For instance, some nonprescription medications may cause dangerous rises in blood pressure, and the labels reflect that danger by recommending that patients speak to a physician before using them. However, some patients ignore the labels completely. Others may choose to ask the pharmacist about the warning. For this reason, it is important for pharmacists to be aware of which products carry the warning and which alternative products may be recommended.

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What Is High Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is reported using two figures, the top number and the bottom number . A normal blood pressure is considered to be 120/80 . Readings of 120 to 139 or 80 to 89 are referred to as prehypertension. If your systolic blood pressure is consistently above 140 or your diastolic pressure is consistently above 90, you are considered to have hypertension .

Which Allergy Drugs Are Ok With High Blood Pressure

11 Fast Facts About Your Child’s Allergies I Have High Blood Pressure. Are Allergy Drugs OK? First things first: Always check with your doctor or pharmacist before you start to take any medication — for allergies , high blood pressure , or anything else. That’s true for herbs and supplements , too. Antihistamines are the most common medication for allergies . Most of them seem to be safe if you have high blood pressure — but again, ask to make sure. Don’t take decongestants unless your doctor tells you otherwise. They may raise your blood pressure . They also keep some high blood pressure drugs from working the way they should. Watch out for combination medications for allergies that include decongestant ingredients. That includes allergy drugs as well as many remedies for cold, flu , and sinus problems. Ask your pharmacist to check the ingredients for you. WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum, MD on December 14, 2016 American Heart Association: “Over-the-Counter Medications.” Harvard Medical School: “Don’t Let Decongestants Squeeze Your Heart.” UpToDate: “Definition, risk factors, and evaluation of resistant hypertension,” “Diphenhydramine.”Continue reading > >

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Taking Decongestants With Other Medicines

Ask a pharmacist or GP before taking decongestants if you’re taking other medicines.

For example, taking decongestants alongside some antidepressants can cause a dangerous rise in blood pressure.

It’s also important to be careful when taking other medicines if you’re using an “all-in-1” decongestant remedy.

“All-in-1” decongestants also contain painkillers or antihistamines, so it could be dangerous to take extra doses of these medicines at the same time.

Page last reviewed: 28 February 2019 Next review due: 28 February 2022

Tips For Choosing Suitable Medications

High Blood Pressure Medications Side Effects Cough ...

When at the pharmacy, a person should look for medications that do not contain decongestants or NSAIDs other than aspirin. A person should read the product label carefully and look at the active ingredients list. This is where drug manufacturers typically list the drugs and their effects.

A person should also avoid medications that are high in sodium. These ingredients can also increase a persons blood pressure.

Some medications, such as NSAIDs, have warning labels on the packaging. The warning is about how the medication may increase a persons blood pressure. People with hypertension or heart disease should avoid any medications that have this label.

Finally, if a person is not sure, they can ask the pharmacist or their doctor. They should mention any conditions they have, such as hypertension or heart disease, as well as any medications they are taking. The pharmacist or doctor will then outline which medications are safe for the person to take.

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Safety Guide For Phenylephrine

Phenylephrine is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and is safe and effective when used according to the Drug Facts label.

Ask a healthcare provider before use if:

For nasal decongestants:
  • You have heart disease, high blood pressure, thyroid disease, diabetes, or difficulty urinating due to an enlarged prostate gland.
  • You are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Before giving a topical nasal decongestant in children under 2 years old.
For hemorrhoid medicines:
  • You have heart disease, high blood pressure, thyroid disease, diabetes, or difficulty urinating due to an enlarged prostate gland.
  • You are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • You are taking a prescription medicine for high blood pressure or depression.
  • Before using a topical hemorrhoid treatment containing phenylephrine on a child under the age of 12.

Do not use if:

For nasal decongestants:
  • Never use an oral medicine containing phenylephrine at the same time as a topical nasal decongestant that also contains phenylephrine.
  • You are currently taking a prescription monoamine oxidase inhibitor or you stopped taking an MAOI less than two weeks ago.
  • You are currently taking certain drugs for depression or a psychiatric or emotional condition.
  • Do not give an oral decongestant or cough and cold medicine containing phenylephrine to a child under the age of 4.
  • Some topical nasal decongestants may be used in children aged 2 and older. Read the Drug Facts label carefully for accurate dosing information.
For hemorrhoid medicines:

What Are Some Other Side Effects Of Coricidin D Cold/flu/sinus

All drugs may cause side effects. However, many people have no side effects or only have minor side effects. Call your doctor or get medical help if any of these side effects or any other side effects bother you or do not go away:

  • Not able to sleep.
  • Feeling sleepy.

These are not all of the side effects that may occur. If you have questions about side effects, call your doctor. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-332-1088. You may also report side effects at https://www.fda.gov/medwatch.

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Why Is There A Warning About Heart Disease High Blood Pressure Or Diabetes

Contac® Cold + Flu advises patients suffering from heart disease, high blood pressure and/or diabetes to consult with their doctor before using Contac. Decongestants in cold medicines decrease the size of enlarged blood vessels in nasal passages, but they can also affect blood vessels in the rest of your body and raise blood pressure. For most people, this increase isnât significant. However, some people can have exaggerated responses to decongestants, contributing to dangerously high blood pressures. As stated on the label, check with your doctor before using Contac Cold + Flu if you have liver disease, heart disease, thyroid disease, diabetes, glaucoma, high blood pressure, trouble urinating due to an enlarged prostate gland , or a breathing problem such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Frequently Asked QuestionsContinue reading > >

The Science Behind Pseudoephedrine

High Blood Pressure and OTC Pain Medications

When you have a cold or an allergy attack, your white blood cells gather in your nasal passages and sinuses. This causes nasal membranes to swell and increases mucus production. Pseudoephedrine constricts these blood vessels, which decreases drainage.

But those same constricted vessels might also increase your blood pressure and heart rate.

Pharmacist Kayla Ryan explains the mechanism of pseudoephedrine. Pseudoephedrine is chemically similar to adrenaline, so the body recognizes it as adrenaline, causing the blood pressure and heart rate to increase.

She refers to one of the last major studies of the effects of pseudoephedrine on blood pressure, which took place in 2005. This study found that pseudoephedrine increased systolic blood pressure by one point on average, while heart rate increased by an average of three beats per minute.

Ryan adds that the immediate-release products had a greater impact on heart rate and blood pressure than their 12 hour or 24 hour extended-release counterparts, which showed a smaller increase in blood pressure.

In 2005, the FDA passed the Combat Methamphetamine Act, which requires pharmacies to sell all medications containing pseudoephedrine behind the counter. At your local drugstore, youll find cards in the cold and flu aisle with information for these medications. You can take the card to the pharmacist, who is required to scan your drivers license before purchase.

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Help For Sinus When I Have High Blood Pressure

Many people suffer from sinus trouble, whether it is a temporary sinus problem or chronic sinusitis. Sinus congestion can cause breathing difficulties, and the extreme congestion leads to sinus headache. Prolonged sinus congestion can lead to sinus infections. There are treatments for congested sinuses, but if you have high blood pressure you must be careful about which treatments you use, as some may actually raise blood pressure.

If you are experiencing serious medical symptoms, seek emergency treatment immediately.

Pseudoephedrine And High Blood Pressure Interaction

In 2005, a study showed that pseudoephedrine increased systolic blood pressure and heart rate, but had no effect on diastolic blood pressure.1 They also found that higher doses and immediate-release formulations of pseudoephedrine were associated with higher blood pressures.1 In addition, the study revealed that patients with well controlled hypertension had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressures after taking immediate release pseudoephedrine formulations.1

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The Effects Of Decongestants On High Blood Pressure

Know the risks

According to the CDC guidelines, nearly half of the U.S. adult population has high blood pressure. If you suffer from high blood pressure, you should know that decongestants may raise your blood pressure and may interfere with the medications you take.

What is the impact of decongestant medicines on blood pressure?

Many over-the-counter cold medicines contain a decongestant that can affect your blood pressure. This can be concerning for people who already have a high blood pressure level.

Why should high blood pressure sufferers consider cold medicines without decongestants?

If you have high blood pressure, its important you choose a cold medicine thats decongestant-free like Coricidin® HBP. It effectively treats cold and flu symptoms without raising your blood pressure.

Can decongestants affect the efficacy of my blood pressure medication?

Yes. Taking decongestants during a cold may interfere with the effectiveness of your blood pressure medications. Its important to speak to your doctor or pharmacist about your medications.

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