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What Causes Your Blood Pressure To Rise

High Blood Pressure And Older Adults

What Causes Your Blood Pressure to Rise at Night | Leonard Pianko MD, Aventura Cardiovascular Center

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High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a major health problem that is common in older adults. Your bodys network of blood vessels, known as the vascular system, changes with age. Arteries get stiffer, causing blood pressure to go up. This can be true even for people who have heart-healthy habits and feel just fine. High blood pressure, sometimes called “the silent killer,” often does not cause signs of illness that you can see or feel. Though it affects nearly half of all adults, many may not even be aware they have it.

If high blood pressure isn’t controlled with lifestyle changes and medication, it can lead to serious health problems, including cardiovascular disease such as heart disease and stroke, vascular dementia, eye problems, and kidney disease. The good news is that blood pressure can be controlled in most people.

How Do You Know If You Have High Blood Pressure

Your blood pressure reading is given as two numbers:

  • Systolic blood pressure. This is the upper number in your reading. Its the pressure when you heart contracts . Your blood pressure is highest when your heart beats and pumps blood.
  • Diastolic blood pressure. This is the lower number in your reading. Its the pressure when your heart relaxes. Your blood pressure falls because your heart is at rest between beats.
  • Your blood pressure reading fits into one of five categories:

  • Normal. Your blood pressure is less than 120/80.
  • Elevated. This is when your systolic blood pressure is between 120-129 and your diastolic pressure is less than 80.
  • Stage 1 high blood pressure. This is when your systolic pressure is between 130-139 or your diastolic pressure is between 80-89.
  • Stage 2 high blood pressure. This is when your systolic pressure is at least 140 or your diastolic is at least 90.
  • Hypertensive crisis. This is when your systolic pressure is higher than 180 and/or your diastolic pressure is higher than 120. Call your health care provider right away if your blood pressure is this high.
  • At each prenatal care checkup, your provider checks your blood pressure. To do this, she wraps a cuff around your upper arm. She pumps air into the cuff to measure the pressure in your arteries when the heart contracts and then relaxes. If you have a high reading, your provider can recheck it to find out for sure if you have high blood pressure. Your blood pressure can go up or down during the day.

    What Is Blood Pressure

    Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of arteries as the heart pumps blood. When a health care professional measures your blood pressure, they use a blood pressure cuff around your arm that gradually tightens. The results are given in two numbers. The first number, called systolic blood pressure, is the pressure caused by your heart contracting and pushing out blood. The second number, called diastolic blood pressure, is the pressure when your heart relaxes and fills with blood.

    A blood pressure reading is given as the systolic blood pressure number over the diastolic blood pressure number. Blood pressure levels are classified based on those two numbers.

    • Low blood pressure, or hypotension, is systolic blood pressure lower than 90 or diastolic blood pressure lower than 60. If you have low blood pressure, you may feel lightheaded, weak, dizzy, or even faint. It can be caused by not getting enough fluids, blood loss, some medical conditions, or medications, including those prescribed for high blood pressure.
    • Normal blood pressure for most adults is defined as a systolic pressure of less than 120 and a diastolic pressure of less than 80.
    • Elevated blood pressure is defined as a systolic pressure between 120 and 129 with a diastolic pressure of less than 80.
    • High blood pressure is defined as 130 or higher for the first number, or 80 or higher for the second number.

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    What Diet Helps Control High Blood Pressure

    • Eat foods that are lower in fat, salt and calories, such as skim or 1% milk, fresh vegetables and fruits, and whole-grain rice and pasta.
    • Use flavorings, spices and herbs to make foods tasty without using salt. The optimal recommendation for salt in your diet is to have less than 1,500 milligrams of sodium a day. Don’t forget that most restaurant foods and many processed and frozen foods contain high levels of salt. Use herbs and spices that do not contain salt in recipes to flavor your food. Dont add salt at the table.
    • Avoid or cut down on foods high in fat or salt, such as butter and margarine, regular salad dressings, fatty meats, whole milk dairy products, fried foods, processed foods or fast foods and salted snacks.
    • Ask your provider if you should increase potassium in your diet. Discuss the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension diet with your provider. The DASH diet emphasizes adding fruits, vegetables and whole grains to your diet while reducing the amount of sodium. Since its rich in fruits and vegetables, which are naturally lower in sodium than many other foods, the DASH diet makes it easier to eat less salt and sodium.

    Excessive Salt Raises Blood Pressure

    What Can Cause An Unexpected Rise In Blood Pressure

    Too much sodium can cause water retention that puts increased pressure on your heart and blood vessels. People with high blood pressure and those at a high risk for developing hypertension, including adults over 50 and black men and women, should have no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium daily of salt.

    Even people with normal levels should eat salt in moderation. Stick to no more than 2,300 mg of sodium , per day.

    Most dietary sodium comes from processed foods. Rules of thumb are to choose foods with 5% or less of the daily value of sodium per serving and opt for fresh poultry, fish and lean meats, rather than canned, smoked or processed. Similarly, fresh or frozen vegetables are better than canned.

    A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found that if people cut just 1/2 teaspoon of salt per day, it could help lower the number of new cases of heart disease per year by up to 120,000.

    Further, potassium found in foods like sweet potatoes, spinach, bananas, oranges, low-fat milk and halibut can counterbalance the pressure-increasing effects of sodium by helping to rid the body of excess sodium.

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    Primary High Blood Pressure

    While the specific cause of primary high blood pressure remains unknown, there is compelling evidence to suggest that a number of risk factors increase your chances of developing the condition.

    These risk factors include:

    • age – the risk of developing high blood pressure increases as you get older
    • a family history of high blood pressure – the condition seems to run in families
    • being of Afro-Caribbean or South Asian origin
    • high-fat diet
    • high amount of salt in your diet
    • lack of exercise
    • excessive alcohol consumption
    • stress

    A number of health conditions, such as diabetes and kidney disease, have also been linked to an increase risk of developing primary high blood pressure.

    Top 10 Causes For Blood Pressure Spikes

    With about 32% of Americans living with high blood pressure, its no wonder why blood pressure checks are administered at every doctors appointment. So many high blood pressure cases are not realized because high blood pressure doesnt exhibit any symptoms.

    The best way to know if you have high blood pressure is to have your blood pressure measured. If your blood pressure is normal , you will likely only need to check on it annually at your yearly checkups. If you have high blood pressure, your doctor may recommend that you monitor your blood pressure at home in addition to lifestyle changes or medications. While your blood pressure levels naturally rise and fall throughout the day, there are some factors that may cause sudden blood pressure spikes.

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    Home Remedies And Lifestyle Changes

    The following can help normalize blood pressure:

    • Stopping smoking: Smoking harms the arteries and can cause high blood pressure.
    • Eating more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and lean protein: Reduce or eliminate added sugars and processed foods.
    • Getting regular exercise: The American Heart Association recommends moderate-intensity exertion, such as walking at a quick pace. A person should do this for 30 minutes per day, at least five days a week.
    • Limiting alcohol consumption: Women should drink no more than one drink per day and men no more than two drinks per day. Drinking more than this can raise blood pressure.
    • Finding healthy ways to lower stress: Meditation, deep breathing exercises, guided imagery, and other techniques to manage stress can help to avoid spikes in blood pressure.
    • Consuming less sodium: Excessively salty foods can cause sharp increases in blood pressure.
    • Reducing the intake of caffeine: Caffeinated drinks can cause temporary spikes in blood pressure, and may make anxiety worse.

    Consult a doctor for personalized guidance.

    Natural High Blood Pressure Remedies

    What causes high blood pressure?

    There are also natural remedies to interject into your daily lifestyle to regulate blood pressure and prevent cases of sudden high blood pressure. Be sure to discuss the use of the following products with your doctor in addition to your health regimen.

    1. Celery

    To prevent a blockage of blood vessels, consume celery daily. It contains phytochemicals that relax the muscles, allowing a smoother blood flow.

    2. Fenugreek Seeds

    This spice has fiber to help maintain blood pressure levels. Boil one to two spoonsful of seeds in water to create a paste. Consume one tablespoon per day.

    3. Lemons

    4. Coconut Water

    Drink daily as a source of vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium to lower blood pressure.

    5. Garlic

    One of natures best immune system boosters, garlic is a blood thinner. Use at least four grams per day.

    A person with high blood pressure is at risk for various health conditions including heart disease. If your high blood pressure numbers rise suddenly, it could indicate an underlying condition that requires immediate medical attention. There are certain medications and hormonal changes that can stimulate an increase in pressure without causing alarm.

    If you have been diagnosed with high blood pressure, talk to your doctor about lifestyle changes and natural remedies in addition to your prescribed health regimen.

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    Monitor Your Blood Pressure Regularly

    The best way to prevent complications and avoid problems is to recognize hypertension early.

    Keep a log of your blood pressure readings and take it to your regular doctor appointments. This can help your doctor see any possible problems before the condition advances.

    People with hypertension can deliver healthy babies despite having the condition. But it can be dangerous to both the birthing parent and baby if its not monitored closely and managed during the pregnancy.

    People with high blood pressure who become pregnant are more likely to develop complications . For example, pregnant women with hypertension may experience decreased kidney function. Babies born to birthing parents with hypertension may have a low birth weight or be born prematurely.

    Some people may develop hypertension during their pregnancies. Several types of high blood pressure problems can develop. The condition often reverses itself once the baby is born. Developing hypertension during pregnancy may increase your risk for developing hypertension later in life.

    How Is Blood Pressure Measured

    Blood pressure is defined as the amount of pressure that is exerted on the artery walls as blood moves through them. It is measured in millimetres of mercury, or mmHg.

    A more detailed explanation is provided below.

    Two measurements are used to measure blood pressure:

    • Systolic pressure – the measure of blood pressure exerted when your heart beats and forces blood around your body.
    • Diastolic pressure – the measure of blood pressure when your heart is resting in between beats.

    Both the systolic and diastolic pressures are measured in millimetres of mercury .

    The figures are usually represented with the systolic pressure first, followed by the diastolic pressure. Therefore, if your GP says that your blood pressure is ‘120 over 80’, or 120/80mmHg, they mean that you have a systolic pressure of 120mmHg and a diastolic pressure of 80mmHg.

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    Do I Have High Blood Pressure

    Anyone can have high blood pressure. Some medical conditions, such as metabolic syndrome, kidney disease, and thyroid problems, can cause high blood pressure. Some people have a greater chance of having it because of things they can’t change. These are:

    • Age. The chance of having high blood pressure increases as you get older, especially isolated systolic hypertension.
    • Gender. Before age 55, men have a greater chance of having high blood pressure. Women are more likely to have high blood pressure after menopause.
    • Family history. High blood pressure tends to run in some families.
    • Race. African Americans are at increased risk for high blood pressure.

    High blood pressure often has no signs or symptoms, but routine checks of your blood pressure will help detect increasing levels. If your blood pressure reading is high at two or more check-ups, the doctor may also ask you to measure your blood pressure at home.

    There are important considerations for older adults in deciding whether to start treatment for high blood pressure if it is above 130/80, including other health conditions and overall fitness. Your doctor may work with you to find a blood pressure target that is best for your well-being and may suggest exercise, changes in your diet, and medications.

    How Can I Prevent High Blood Pressure

    Various Causes That Can Increase Your Blood Pressure

    You can help prevent high blood pressure by having a healthy lifestyle. This means:

    If you already have high blood pressure, it is important to prevent it from getting worse or causing complications. You should get regular medical care and follow your prescribed treatment plan. Your plan will include healthy lifestyle habit recommendations and possibly medicines.

    NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

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    What Can I Expect If I Have This Condition

    Since high blood pressure doesnt cause many symptoms at first, you probably wont feel any different with a high blood pressure diagnosis. But its important to follow your providers instructions to bring your blood pressure down so it doesnt cause serious illnesses later in life.

    How long does high blood pressure last?

    If you have primary high blood pressure, youll need to control it for the rest of your life.

    If you have secondary high blood pressure, your blood pressure will most likely come down after you receive treatment for the medical problem that caused it. If a medication caused your high blood pressure, switching to a different medicine may lower your blood pressure.

    What is the outlook for high blood pressure?

    You can get seriously ill if you dont treat your high blood pressure. However, if you take the medicines your provider ordered, you can control your blood pressure. Exercising and eating healthy foods also helps lower your blood pressure.

    What Causes Systolic Hypertension

    Several psychological and physical factors can impact systolic blood pressure in an individual. However, it is important to keep in mind that blood pressure is not a static measurement, as the values for both systolic and diastolic ranges change constantly throughout the day. This is because your circulatory system is a dynamic structure that has to adjust to various stressors. As a result, your doctor will never make a diagnosis of hypertension from a single visit, but rather take blood pressure readings across multiple visits before making a definite diagnosis.

    Every organ in the body contributes to your blood pressure, with the kidneys, heart, and brain playing the biggest roles in systolic blood pressure values. Heart health can directly create a significant impact on systolic blood pressure, as the force its creates may have to pump harder if you suffer from medical conditions. Having kidney failure will also lead to increases in blood pressure due to the ineffective removal of excess fluid, creating an increased burden on the heart.

    Factors affecting our mental state, such as being frightened or anxious, can also affect systolic blood pressure. This is an autonomic response by the body to help deal with immediate stressors. These situations typically result in increased heart rate and blood pressure, as your body is preparing to go into action.

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    Causes And Risk Factors Of High Blood Pressure

    The following can increase your chances of developing high blood pressure.

    Older age The risk of high blood pressure increases as you age.

    According to the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey , 70 percent of adults age 65 or older have hypertension.

    The risk of prehypertension and high blood pressure has been increasing in recent years in young people, too, including children and teens, possibly because of the rise of obesity in these populations.

    Race High blood pressure is more common in Black American adults than in white or Hispanic American adults.

    Family history Having a family history of high blood pressure increases your risk, as the condition tends to run in families.

    Being overweight The more you weigh, the more blood you need to supply oxygen and nutrients to your tissues. As the volume of blood circulating through your blood vessels increases, so does the pressure on your artery walls. Obesity especially abdominal obesity also increases stiffness in arteries, which raises blood pressure.

    Lack of physical activity People who are inactive tend to have a higher heart rate and higher blood pressure than those who are physically active. Not exercising also increases the risk of being overweight.

    Dietary choices What you choose to eat can increase your risk for hypertension, including in the following ways:

    Alcohol consumption Drinking more than two drinks a day for men and more than one drink a day for women may raise your blood pressure.

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